Bravo Series

Harriet Krijgh

Marco Borggreve

6-concert series starting at $128

The Bravo Series opens with a world premiere concert written for Canadian superstar pianist Angela Hewitt. Over the course of this six-concert series, you’ll experience a variety of musical virtuosity. From great saxophonist Branford Marsalis, to debuts by pianist Boris Giltburg and cellist Harriet Krijgh, to a masterful solo turn for violinist Jessica Linnebach, Bravo has something for everyone.

Three CASUAL FRIDAYS concerts are available as part of the Bravo series. Concert times, repertoire and other details have been modified to suit this exciting series.

  1. Lintu and Hewitt

    Ideas of North Festival

    NAC Southam Hall

    • Sibelius The Océanides
    • Matthew Whittall Nameless Seas*
    • Sibelius Symphony No. 2

    Waves of Sound and Sea

    Surrender to the siren-song of the sea in this evening of music inspired by the ocean. Special guest Hannu Lintu, Chief Conductor of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, summons naiads with every note of Sibelius’ symphonic poem The Oceanides. Juno-award winning pianist Angela Hewitt carries us across Nameless Seas* in a new composition written especially for her.  Close your eyes and let the soundwaves sweep you away.

    *NAC co-commission with PianoEspoo; world premiere

    Thursday Bravo series subscribers attend this concert.

  2. Sibelius’s Violin Concerto

    Casual Fridays with the NAC Orchestra

    NAC Southam Hall

    • Sibelius Violin Concerto
    • Esa-Pekka Salonen Stockholm Diary
    • Sibelius Symphony No. 5 (third movement: Allegro Molto)

    Sixteen swans flying through the April sky inspired the final movement of Jean Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony. “One of the great experiences of my life! God, how beautiful,” he wrote in his diary, alongside a jotting of musical notes that became the symphony’s famous ‘swan’ theme. Let your heart soar with the timeless beauty of Sibelius’ music in this evening dedicated to the Finnish master, featuring renowned Canadian violinist Karen Gomyo. Hailed by the Chicago Tribune as “a first-rate artist of real musical command, vitality, brilliance and intensity,” Gomyo displays her virtuosity in Sibelius’s ravishingly complex Violin Concerto in D minor.

    • Haydn Violin Concerto in C major
    • Beethoven Symphony No. 2
    • Haydn Symphony No. 84

    After touring the concert halls of the world, Pinchas Zukerman returns for a special guest appearance with the orchestra he led to international acclaim. First, the maestro brings Beethoven and Haydn to life with his prodigious violin technique. Then, he steps to the podium to conduct Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2, written at a time when Beethoven’s deafness was becoming more pronounced. After a Dr. recommend he leave Vienna for rural Heiligenstadt, along with other prescriptions, Beethoven quickly found himself in the pastoral suburb, and admitting to the permanency of his malady. Surprisingly, what came out of this admission is one of his most energetic, cheerful and outgoing works: his Second Symphony.  

    • SMETANA Overture to The Bartered Bride
    • Bartók Violin Concerto No. 2
    • Dvořák Symphony No. 7

    Embark on an orchestral journey to Central Europe, in this evening dedicated to three composers who brought the music of peasants to the opera houses of the world. Dvořák, the son of a Bohemian innkeeper, wove the rustic melodies of his childhood into romantic symphonies, while Bartók used the ancient scales of Hungarian folk songs to inject new vitality into classical music. Smetana’s frolicsome The Bartered Bride remains one of the world’s most beloved comic operas.

    Friday Bravo series subscribers attend Wednesday performance.

  3. Classical Marsalis

    NAC Southam Hall

    • Saint-Saëns Suite algérienne
    • GLAZUNOV Saxophone Concerto
    • Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 1, “Winter Dreams”

    When a Russian conductor teams up with an American jazzman to perform classical music, the result is saxophone as you’ve never heard it before. Composed in 1934 when Alexander Glazunov was living in self-imposed exile in Paris, the Saxophone Concerto brims with homesickness, yet flows with a musical freedom impermissable in Soviet-era Russia. After performing to rave reviews with the New York Philharmonic and Toronto Symphony Orchestra, three-time Grammy award winner Branford Marsalis pairs up once again with internationally-renowned conductor Andrey Boreyko for a concert hailed by critics as an “unmitigated delight.”

    Thursday Bravo series subscribers attend this concert. 

    • Conductor

      Andrey Boreyko

    • Saxophone

      Branford Marsalis

    • NAC Orchestra

  4. Classical Marsalis

    Casual Fridays with the NAC Orchestra

    NAC Southam Hall

    • GLAZUNOV Saxophone Concerto
    • Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 1, “Winter Dreams”

    When a Russian conductor teams up with an American jazzman to perform classical music, the result is saxophone as you’ve never heard it before. Composed in 1934 when Alexander Glazunov was living in self-imposed exile in Paris, the Saxophone Concerto brims with homesickness, yet flows with a musical freedom impermissable in Soviet-era Russia. After performing to rave reviews with the New York Philharmonic and Toronto Symphony Orchestra, three-time Grammy award winner Branford Marsalis pairs up once again with internationally-renowned conductor Andrey Boreyko for a concert hailed by critics as an “unmitigated delight.”

    Friday Bravo Series subscribers attend this concert.

    • Conductor

      Andrey Boreyko

    • Saxophone

      Branford Marsalis

    • NAC Orchestra

    • Brahms Symphony No. 2
    • Vivian Fung New Work*
    • Shostakovich Piano Concerto No. 2

    Shake off the end-of-winter doldrums with this evening of sunny melodies and toe-tapping mischief. Hold on to your hats as the nimble fingers of soloist Boris Giltburg dance their way through Shostakovich’s cheeky Piano Concerto No. 2. Giltburg’s 2017 recording of the concerto won rave reviews for its “dashing virtuosity” and “reckless, to-hell-with-it abandon.” End the evening on a bucolic note with Brahms’ Pastoral Symphony, a piece once decribed as “all rippling streams, blue sky, sunshine, and cool green shadows.”

    “…Giltburg has the capacity to identify with and encapsulate the moods of each piece while artlessly crafting them into a shapely span.” –Daily Telegraph

    *World premiere; NAC Orchestra commission. 

  5. Mozart à la Haydn

    NAC Southam Hall

    • SCHNITTKE Moz-Art à la Haydn
    • Haydn Cello Concerto in C major
    • Mozart Symphony No. 39

    Discover a long-lost musical treasure with Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C. Written in the 1760s for the private orchestra of Prince Eszterhazy of Austria, the concerto disappeared for 200 years — until a young musicologist found a hand-written copy in the Czech National Library in 1961. Shining in the solo role, 25-year-old cellist Harriet Krijgh brings tender lyricism to her performance, living up to her promise as a 2015/16 “Rising Star” of the European Concert Hall Organization.

    Thursday Bravo series subscribers attend this concert. 

  6. Mozart à la Haydn

    Casual Fridays with the NAC Orchestra

    NAC Southam Hall

    • SCHNITTKE Moz-Art à la Haydn
    • Haydn Cello Concerto in C major
    • Mozart Symphony No. 39

    Discover a long-lost musical treasure with Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C. Written in the 1760s for the private orchestra of Prince Eszterhazy of Austria, the concerto disappeared for 200 years — until a young musicologist found a hand-written copy in the Czech National Library in 1961. Shining in the solo role, 25-year-old cellist Harriet Krijgh brings tender lyricism to her performance, living up to her promise as a 2015/16 “Rising Star” of the European Concert Hall Organization.

    Friday Bravo Series subscribers attend this concert. 
     

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