November 2020 update on live performances and events at the NAC.
This event ended on: Nov 14, 2020

Curiosity, Genius, and the Search for Petula Clark

with the NAC Orchestra

Music Classical music Masterworks
  • #CanadaPerforms
  • NAC Orchestra

  Saturday, November 14, 2020, 8:00 pm EST   90 minutes with no intermission.

SAMUEL COLERIDGE-TAYLOR Ballade for Orchestra FRANÇOIS DOMPIERRE Les Diableries Kelly-Marie Murphy Curiosity, Genius, and the Search for Petula Clark Chopin Grande Polonaise Brillante, Op. 22 Mozart Symphony No. 41 in C major, “Jupiter”

Join us on a musical journey of discovery and delight as we explore repertoire ranging from classical to contemporary-bringing to life the incredible talents of diverse artists.

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was without doubt the most prominent Black composer of his time. His spirited and passionate Ballade for Orchestra opens this exciting program.

Our livestream orchestra concerts continue to showcase the incredible talents of CBC’s classical “30 Under 30” artists for 2020. Elizabeth Skinner, 29-year-old violinist from Victoria, will delight audiences with Les Diableries written by Ottawa-born, Quebec-based composer François Dompierre. The violin solo is playful and reminiscent of traditional fiddle music, all the while nodding to a dark, devilish theme.

A highlight of the concert will be Kelly-Marie Murphy’s Curiosity, Genius, and the Search for Petula Clark which was premiered by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in 2017.  Proudly showcasing the percussion section, this whimsical piece was inspired by Glenn Gould’s fascination with chasing radio stations while driving in Northern Ontario and catching snippets of a pop song he was particularly fond of: Petula Clark’s Who Am I?. “Murphy’s piece is completely fun to hear, very film-score-inspired, yet fully capable of standing alone in a concert setting.” (Jenna Simeonov, schmopera.com)

Jessica Yuma, of Edmonton, will be our second “30 Under 30” guest soloist of the evening, performing Chopin’s Grande Polonaise Brillante, which is both playful and exquisite.

To close the concert, we turn to Mozart’s last symphony. This grand and lofty work is full of pure and fiery passion, and has long been considered his best symphony of all. Evidence that the composer’s prowess never waned.

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