Connecting Canada and the World

Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer and Marjolaine Fournier, hosts of the NAC’s popular Explore the Symphony podcast. © Martin Jones

The next time you’re in the NAC’s Southam Hall lobby, take a moment to peek through the window of the Hexagon Studio. You might see NAC Orchestra clarinetist Sean Rice teaching his students at St. John’s Memorial University via ultra-high definition video-conferencing technology. Or you might catch a glimpse of emerging artists such as Indigenous folk music duo Twin Flames, connecting with students in Northern Ontario and Nunavut. Or see Jean-Jacques van Vlasselaer and Marjolaine Fournier, hosts of the NAC’s popular Explore the Symphony podcast, share a belly laugh during a recording session over a certain composer’s quirks.

The Studio is the centerpiece of the Hexagon Project, which aims to extend and enhance the NAC’s national role in arts education and support Canada’s artists and creators through the use of new technologies. The space is connected to a state-of-the-art control room and to a wonderfully versatile education space called the Shenkman Smith Atelier. “This new space allows us to host a wide-range of activities such as public masterclasses which connect mentors and students from around the world,” says Maurizio Ortolani, Senior Director for Digital Engagement at the NAC.

“The Hexagon Project makes connections that would not otherwise be possible.”

Read the full article: nac-cna.ca/connect


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